Black Victoriana: Part Two

African American men I received an overwhelming response to the blog post Black Victoriana, so I decided to post more photos of African Americans from way back when.  My Black Victoriana post, to date, has received the most views and comments of any other blog post that I have ever done since starting my blog in 2011.  My other posts do not even come anywhere near the views and comments that Black Victoriana has received.  My main reason for posting those photos is because I wanted people to see African Americans from the late 19th and early to middle 20th century in a different light.  It is a way that is how we represented ourselves daily back in the day.  We are not a group of people who mostly grew up in ghettos, turned to drugs and did not care about educating ourselves.  The reality was quite the opposite.  Education was extremely important to us, so we paved the way to start our own Universities.  We did what had to be done to move forward from slavery and lead productive lives.  We were law abiding citizens even though the law, for the most part, did not respect us.  We were well dressed and well coiffed in the elegant styles of the times.   Where possible I will link to photo source, but some of them I had for so long that I cannot recall where I found them.  Some also now have outdated links so I simply left them off.  Of you see a photo here  and you are the original source, simply let me know and I will be happy to credit you.  In the first photo above that looks like George Washington Carver sitting in the center front row.

univsouthcarolinagolfers

(photo source)

Golf was a segregated sport in the United State up to1961.  Therefore, in 1921 a group of black investors purchased an old country club and renamed it Shady Rest.  It was the nations first African American golf and country club.  Originally it was the Ephraim Tucker farmhouse built in the middle 1700’s.

chidren

sahdyrestmembers

golf

 

cab calloway

The always elegant Cab Calloway.

 

Ella+Fitzgerald++Duke+Ellington

Duke Ellington and Ella Fitzgerald

 

HostsandguestsdressedupforabackyardpicnicJohnJohnsonCourtesyDouglasKeisterNMAAHCSIPhotosfromLostandFoundAgainPhotosofAfricanAmericansonthePlains(photo source)

I love this photo above of African Americans having a backyard picnic.

Late 1800s Tintype Portrait of African American Couple

Tintype portrait of African American couple

 

Negro HomesteadersThe above and below photos are of “Negro Homesteaders”.   Many blacks fled the south and tried to obtain land through the Homestead Act.  There is plenty of information on blacks and the Homestead Act for its own blog post.  Notice in both photos that the families are dressed in the best way that they know how for the picture taking.  I think they are all beautiful.

pe0020-01

photo by Hugh Magnum

Unknown woman by photographer Hugh Magnum

 

Mary McLeod Bethune

Mary McLeod Bethune

 

Rosebud Denham, 1885-1910

Rosebud Denham

 

Toby James and his children Myrtha, Edna and Mauranee.

Toby James and his children Myrtha, Edna and Mauranee.

 

Town council, Boley, Oklahoma, ca. 1907–10

Town council, Boley, Oklahoma, ca. 1907–1910

 

Wedding party 1910

A wedding party in 1910.

 

1880 s black victorian lady

Black Victorian lady in the 1880’s.

 

Yale Law School, class of 1921 left to right  J. Alston Atkins, Charles A. Chandler, Mifflin Gibbs, and Leroy Pierce. Class of 1921Above photo – Yale Law School, class of 1921 (left to right): J. Alston Atkins, Charles A. Chandler, Mifflin Gibbs, and Leroy Pierce.

Pharoah Sanders, John Coltrane, Alice Coltrane, Jimmy Garrison and Rashied Ali outside the Village Vanguard, New York, May 28, 1966.Above, left to right:  Pharoah Sanders, John Coltrane, Alice Coltrane, Jimmy Garrison and Rashied Ali outside the Village Vanguard, New York, May 28, 1966.

Thelma Porter Miss Subway 1948

Miss Subway of 1948, Thelma Porter.

 

fashionable African American woman

unknown African American woman

 

Howard University featured in Life Magazine circa 1946

Howard University students in 1946.

 

Brown family in Coney Island 1911

Tintype of 1870

1870 tintype of unidentified black woman.

 

1916 convention of former slaves in Washington DCAbove photo:  Two women attending a convention of former slaves in Washington D.C.  circa 1916.

unknown is stripped dress

Unknown African American woman.

 

Rhoda Ray circa 1897

Rhoda Ray circa 1897. Rhoda was born a slave and freed in 1865.

 

girl during the 1930 s.

Circa 1930’s

 

Fisk University students

Fisk University students circa 1910.

 

I hope that you enjoyed these photos.  They can also be found on my Pinterest page.  Click on Africans and the Victorian period where you will find them along with other photos that I found there.

.

Your Charming Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *